Tag Archives: Fantasy

Does the End Justify the Means?

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State of Nature

Aubrey returns to the Foundation where Hannah has been busy rebuilding. He confronts her regarding her betrayal only to realize she has taken complete control with the professor as her assistant. Acting under Hannah’s command, Aubrey goes back down into Holocene II to save his friends. In a daring escape, he treks halfway around the world to China to meet with the mysterious Chief. Will they be able to take Hannah down or will mankind finally be destroyed?

Winfield’s third novel in The Park Service Trilogy, State of Nature, hits you with twist after twist. It’s almost like being slapped in the face. It also gives one pause to think about all the moral implications that are discussed.

::SPOILERS:: Does one punish a book’s rating because the reader doesn’t like the subject matter? No, I think that would be unfair. The discovery that Hannah is really 30 years old and has been making out with a 15-year-old creeps me out. But, what is even worse was to find out that they are half brother and sister. I feel that this subject matter is inappropriate in a young adult novel.

The book is very interesting and completes the trilogy well. The ending sucked.

4 out of 5 stars.

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A Very Deadly Game

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Strings cover

Pia is a nanotech apprentice to her father for the Corporation. Her entire life she has been connected to 15 strings that control her every move. As long as she does what the strings want they just follow along with her. Any movement that the strings don’t like they jerk her back into place or exact punishment on her father. But, the Corporation is not everything it seems. Something sinister is going on keeping Pia and her father prisoners.

Estes novel, Strings, modernizes and retells the story of Pinocchio. There is even a mechanical Jimmy Cricket named Fig. This is a very dark and disturbing tale of a corporation using its might over Pia and her father. Once she starts to question the Corporation, things start to get worse for them. Those that befriend Pia are not as they seem. And, everyone is caught up in a deadly game.

I didn’t know what to expect when I started this book. It quickly caught my attention and was hard to put down.

5 out of 5 stars.

Lies Exposed

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Alpha Field

Beth 259201 has enjoyed her new-found freedom. But, she wants FERTS destroyed and all Beth’s free. After a near death battle at the camp secrets 201 has tried to convey were brought to light. Now, with the help of the survivors she launches a quest back to FERTS.

Hudson’s third novel in the FERTS series, Alpha Field, brings 201’s life in full circle. The visions she has experienced help her fulfill her destiny. This action-packed thriller will have you on the edge of your seat as you turn page after page to follow the action.

The paranormal aspect of this series is not my cup of tea. It did not take away from the story or Hudson’s ability to craft a well written tale. I recommend the entire series.

5 out of 5 stars.

Interview with Author Adrienne Lecter

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CTC:       Today I have the pleasure of interviewing Adrienne Lecter, author of the amazing zombie apocalypse series, Green Fields.

GF Incubation     GF Outbreak     GF Escalation

GF Extinction     GF Resurgence     GF Unity

Thank you so much for joining me and taking time to answer a few questions for my readers. Let’s get started, shall we?

When did you first realize that you wanted to be a writer?

AL:          When I started writing my first book at age 13, but it was much closer to 30 that I considered it in earnest.

CTC:       How long does it take you to write a book?

AL:          Anywhere from four weeks to six months. I try to get the first draft done in 6-8 weeks.

CTC:       What is your work schedule like when you’re writing?

AL:          Ideally, I sit down in the morning and write until late afternoon, with some light editing and social media in the evening. Some days that works perfectly. Others, not so much. I usually finish writing my books at 3am after working myself to the bone for the last few days, so that should give you an idea how well my time management works.

CTC:       What would you say is your interesting writing quirk?

AL:          Not sure if that counts, but I fully visualize my books before I sit down to write.

CTC:       Where do you get your information or ideas for your books?

AL:          I love to do a lot of research, which as a former scientist who writes from a former scientist’s POV during the zombie apocalypse can get very interesting. I would be lost without YouTube and Google StreetView.

CTC:       When did you write your first book and how old were you?

AL:          I started in 1996 when I was 13, a few months after we got our first computer. That abomination will never see the light of day, but I have plans to revisit the world and do a complete re-write.

CTC:       What do you like to do when you’re not writing?

AL:          Read, play video games, ride my motorcycle. The usual 😉

CTC:       What does your family think of your writing?

AL:          Only my boyfriend has read my books, but my parents are surprisingly impressed with the fact that their daughter is a published author. Everyone is very supportive, which I consider a true blessing.

CTC:       What was one of the most surprising things you learned in creating your books?

AL:          That as an Indie author you’re lucky if 50% of the work you do is actual writing. I never expected how much else there is to releasing books in multiple formats.

CTC:       How many books have you written? Which is your favorite?

AL:          Written, close to 30, I think. Published under this name, 6; Under another penname, 13 altogether.

My favorite is Incubation, the first in the Green Fields series. It was the “make it” book in the “make it or break it” phase of my writing career.

CTC:       Do you have any suggestions to help me become a better writer? If so, what are they?

AL:          Read. That’s really the best suggestion to hone your craft. Read, and write. Don’t re-write, don’t edit your one manuscript until it has lost all soul and voice. You need to create and be inspired as a writer, so keep the ball rolling!

CTC:       Do you hear from your readers much? What kinds of things do they say?

AL:          They can be a chatty bunch, mostly on facebook and via email. I like to think that I’m doing something right, writing slightly off the beaten path in the zombie apocalypse genre. What a lot of readers mention (particularly when they recommend the books) is how dark and twisted they are. If it works for them, it sure works for me!

CTC:       Do you like to create books for adults?

AL:          Yes. I wouldn’t dare even consider writing for children. I’d traumatize them for life!

CTC:       What do you think makes a good story?

AL:          Great characters and an engaging plot. You need both. I’m also a huge fan of Stephen King’s idea of writing about what scares you the most. As a horror writer, that’s really all you need for inspiration.

CTC:       As a child, what did you want to do when you grew up?

AL:          Be a scientist. Tried that, can’t recommend it 100%, but it gave me a lot of ideas for the books I’m writing now.

CTC:       Again, thank you, Adrienne, for allowing me to take up your time.

You can follow Adrienne Lecter here:

http://adriennelecter.com

http://facebook.com/adriennelecter

https://www.amazon.com/Adrienne-Lecter/e/B016AD26SE/

Adrienne Lecter logo

The Very Definition of Love

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The Monsters Death cover

Ren Lewis has evolved so much from the first book. He has found love and will do anything to keep it – forever. It’s life as usual at The Lucidites Institute even though they are still recovering from an apocalyptic event. Ren feels that he has done more than his share to keep the world safe and that it is time to pass the torch. Can he really walk away from his work, his family, and his friends?

Noffke’s fourth and final book in the Ren series, Ren: The Monster’s Death, draws to conclusion the story of Ren Lewis. It has been a wonderful ride. Even though he is a character in many of her other books, Ren’s stories will be dearly missed.

This book is shows more than anything else what true love is and what one man will do to keep it alive. I’ve never liked Ren’s lady love, Dahlia, but I’ve never wished her any harm either. What I didn’t realize was the depth to which Ren loved her.

A well-written and edited book by Noffke. A great addition to the Ren collection.

5 out of 5 stars.

Interview with Author Tania Hagan

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CTC – Today I have the pleasure of interviewing Tania Hagan, author of the amazing dystopian novel, The Cure.

The Cure

Thank you so much for joining me and taking time to answer a few questions for my readers. Let’s get started, shall we?

When did you first realize you wanted to be a writer?

TH – I sort of fell into news and feature writing right out of college. I didn’t know I would love writing fiction until I sat down to write The Cure.

CTC – How long does it take you to write a book?

TH – The Cure took about nine months. It’s a lengthy novel at 112 thousand words. The sequel is taking me about the same amount of time.

CTC – What is your work schedule like when you’re writing?

TH – I do my best work in the morning, but I’ve been known to stay up late typing. I don’t really have a schedule, since I don’t have a day job.

CTC – What would you say is your interesting writing quirk?

TH – I write whenever I get an idea. I literally stop in the grocery aisles to type into my phone, if an interesting concept hits me. I think that might be a quirk.

CTC – Where do you get your information or ideas for your books?

TH – I try to think of topics that have not yet been explored.
My idea for The Cure series came out of a conversation I had with my brother. He was discussing another possible idea for a book about cloning. Suddenly it hit me–what would happen in human cloning was mandated by the government? What if the only legal way to procreate was through cloning?

CTC – When did you write your first book and how old were you?

TH – The Cure was my first book, and I was forty-something.

CTC – What do you like to do when you’re not writing?

TH – I’m a stay-at-home mom, so my daughter is my life.

CTC – What does your family think of your writing?

TH – My family is incredibly supportive. We come from a long line of media people, so I have professional eyes everywhere with my extended family.

CTC – What was one of the most surprising things you learned in creating your books?

TH – The most surprising thing was that I actually could do it. I was also shocked at how quickly The Cure was picked up by my publisher.

CTC – How many books have you written? Which is your favorite?

TH – I’ve written The Cure, and I’m nearly done with the sequel. I also have a part in the anthology, Lurking in the Shadows.
So, I’m fairly new to this business.

CTC – What is it about your writing that sets you apart from other authors?

TH – I think my writing is typically in plain, easy to follow language. My goal is to make the reader feel like he or she is experiencing the words, rather than reading them.
I also strive to make my subject matter different from anything anyone has ever read. I’m fairly confident I accomplished that goal with The Cure. Although Dystopian books are everywhere, no one has ever attempted a theme quite like mine. If I couldn’t come up with something entirely original, I don’t think I would be a writer.

CTC – Do you have any suggestions to help me become a better writer? If so, what are they?

TH – The best advice I can give to anyone is to read, read, read!! You can’t write if you aren’t an avid reader.

CTC – Do you hear from your readers much? What kinds of things do they say?

TH – I do! I’m blessed with the most amazing readers.
They tell me if they liked my book, and how it has affected them. We also just chat about life events in general. I’ve made some awesome friends through this whole process.

CTC – Do you like to create books for adults?

TH – So far, I’m primarily a YA author. I do have an upcoming short story for adults. It’s not adult content though. My writing is very tame.
It seems like The Cure somehow appeals to all ages, male and female. So, even though I write for a YA audience, everyone gets something out of my work.

CTC – What do you think makes a good story?

TH – A good story is anything that will stick with you. A reader once told me she knew my book was important to her because she remembered random scenes long after she finished the book. Comments like that make my day.

CTC – As a child, what did you want to do when you grew up?

TH – I wanted to be a teacher. I’ve been a preschool teacher. When I got married, all I wanted to do was to be a mommy. Being a mom is my number-one accomplishment.
I suppose we all change a bit from whatever we wanted to do as a child. I’m very content being a mom and an author.

CTC – Again, thank you, Tania, for allowing me to take up your time.

You can follow Tania Hagan here:

http://taniahagan.com/

https://twitter.com/tania_hagan

https://www.facebook.com/TaniaHaganAuthor/?fref=ts

http://smile.amazon.com/Tania-Hagan/e/B01BQ4M8YY/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1464463812&sr=8-1

https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/14739174.Tania_Hagan

Tania Hagan photo What do you do when the monster is you?

Do the Lucidites ask to much of Roya?

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Stunned cover

Roya Stark fought the battle of her life saving the Lucidites and herself from the monster Zhuang. Finding the Lucidites full of secrets and possible lies she is ready to leave the Institute and start a new life with her pseudo parents. But, the Institute and the Lucidites are not done with her and her powers just yet. Why does everything have to be so hard? And, why is she the answer to everything wrong in the Lucidite world?

Noffke’s second novel in The Lucidites Series, Stunned, picks up with Roya anxiously counting the days before she will leave the Institute for good. She has been overwhelmed with revelations about her life and seeks the comfort afforded to her by Bob and Steve, her pseudo parents. Her life has her torn between two very different young men of whom she both loves.

Roya’s character continues to develop as she grows into her new role as a member of the Dream Traveler society. Every bit the typical teenaged girl exploring her emotions and sometimes being a brat, or a prat as Ren would call her. The war between the Lucidites and another faction of Dream Travelers again tests and expands her abilities.

This book is very fast paced and a rollercoaster of emotions. I actually found it more enjoyable than the first book in this series. Again, this is not my genre, but I am willing to stretch my mind and go all the way to the end.

5 out of 5 stars.