Tag Archives: Young Adult

To Believe Is To Die

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The Believers cover

Riley Meemick has successfully rescued her mother from The Breeders. But, not before they implanted one of their experimental fetuses into her. The road is hard on Riley’s mother as the baby is growing at an accelerated rate. A group of mutants capture Riley and her group and take them to the self-proclaimed Messiah at the Citadel. Their intent is for the group to join the believers and consume the tainted holy water as a display of faith. All Riley wants to do is to escape and find her Auntie.

French’s second novel in The Breeders series, The Believers is a dystopian romance. It’s an easy read and is paced well. The editing is much better than the first book. The story is sad and at times heartbreaking.

The Breeders are relentless in the pursuit of any free female. They will not give up their search for Riley. Hopefully, with Clay’s help, she can stay hidden.

4 out of 5 stars.

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SciFi at its best! Short and sweet.

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From the Stars cover

I’m not a big fan of short stories as I always want more. LOL This is a compilation of wonderfully written young adult science fiction short stories! Each an exciting fast read. One in particular showcases Norma Hinkens at her best. I thoroughly enjoyed reading each of these and recommend them highly.

A Puzzle to Save Mankind

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Isle of Man

With the founder and most of the Foundation seemingly destroyed, Aubrey finds that there is more going on than he realized. In order to gain control of the drones and other devices that are programmed to kill all humans, he has to journey to a faraway land.  Those he thought he could trust may turn out to be those that try to destroy his plans to save humanity.

Winfield’s second novel in The Park Service Trilogy, Isle of Man, expands the relationship between Aubrey and his best friend, Jimmy. We learn more about the mission of the Foundation and what they have been trying to achieve.  And, we watch Aubrey’s innocence and wonder shine through as he explores more of the world above ground.

The cruise in the submarine to the Isle of Man was almost as boring as the occupants claimed to be themselves. The betrayal at the end was heart wrenching.

4 out of 5 stars.

Are Humans a Virus?

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The Park Service cover

Aubrey has always lived on Level 3 of Holocene II five kilometers underground. He has been taught that everything above ground is a toxic wasteland covered in ice due to the War over 900 years ago. By an accident of nature, Aubrey finds himself above ground in what can only be described as paradise. Driven by a desire to find answers to the lies he has lived with for 15 years and after witnessing deadly drones kill the people he has befriended, Aubrey heads north in search of the Foundation.

Winfield’s first novel in The Park Service Trilogy, The Park Service, explores some ethical and moral dilemmas regarding mankind’s role in destroying the Earth. It is also a story about friendship and loyalty. This young adult dystopian tale does an excellent job of world building and character development.

The trek to locate the Foundation is a bit long and tedious. Winfield answers just enough questions to leave you wanting for more.

4 out of 5 stars.

Interview with Author Angie Grigaliunas

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CTC:       Today I have the pleasure of interviewing Angie Grigaliunas, author of the medieval dystopian Sowing.

Sowing Cover

Thank you for joining us today, Angie. Let’s get started, shall we?

When did you first realize you wanted to be a writer?

AG:       It’s been a gradual thing, really. I’m not sure of one specific moment when I was like, “Yeah, this is what I want to do.” It’s something I’ve always loved, though I got away from it for a while in my teens. I never stopped writing completely, but it wasn’t my focus. I’d say around March 2006, I buckled down and decided to be serious. So just over eleven years ago!

CTC:       How long does it take you to write a book?

AG:        I have no set answer for this. Ack! My very first book (about elves), I wrote in just over a year, I believe. That was back when I was like 18. My first published book (Sowing) took about a year to write as well…but I had been working on the world for a couple of years before that with a different book one (Searching for Silver). This most recent one (Quelling, book two of that series) is up to about a year so far, if not more, and it’s not done yet. It really just depends.

I take however long it requires, there! Haha!

CTC:       What is your work schedule like when you’re writing?

AG:       I write when I can. I have a day job and work 30 hrs/wk, so it’s a lot of writing on the weekends or evenings.

CTC:       What would you say is your interesting writing quirk?

AG:       Um…a quirk…hmm. Well, talking to my characters? Arguing with them? That’s pretty quirky…and I do that a lot…

CTC:       Where do you get your information or ideas for your books?

AG:       The ideas just come, haha! I get inspiration from everywhere. Conversations, radio talk, songs, articles, brainstorming with friends/critique partners, prompts, dreams every once in a while, etc. I’ve done research on a bunch of different topics and time periods.

CTC:       When did you write your first book and how old were you?

AG:       My first complete book…I believe I started it when I was about 18 ½. It’s the one I mentioned above and took about a year to write.

CTC:       What do you like to do when you’re not writing?

AG:       Walking/exercising, hanging out with my husband, facebooking…

CTC:       What does your family think of your writing?

AG:       For a while, they were skeptical and not super encouraging. They kind of thought I was wasting my time. My mom was always supportive, but the dream of publishing was so far-fetched at the time. Now that Sowing is published and in actual book-form, the skepticism has faded into awe and interest. Funny how that happens! 😉

CTC:       What was one of the most surprising things you learned in creating your books?

AG:       That characters take over! They truly do! It’s the weirdest but coolest thing. I’ve also learned just how much I love writing. I can’t imagine doing anything else.

CTC:       How many books have you written? Which is your favorite?

AG:       I’ve completed four now:

-elf one (the one I mentioned previously)

-former book one (Searching for Silver) of my current series (The Purification Era)

-Sowing (actual book one of The Purification Era)

-and as of 4/1/17 (!!!!!!!!! It still needs a lot of edits/revision, but it’s WRITTEN!!!), Quelling (book two)

As for favorite…oh gosh. The elf one was a huge accomplishment – the first book I ever completed – but Searching for Silver was a massive undertaking, taxing, and took like 2 ½ years (and sadly, most of it is now unusable, but still…such a valuable time of learning). Sowing was amazing, and I adore it so much. First published book, eep! Quelling is especially special (“especially special,” haha! Say that five times fast!) because I have never completed a sequel to anything before. Ahh, I love them all for their own reasons! Since I’m coming off the high of Quelling, I’m almost leaning toward that one; it builds on the world in Sowing so much more…and the characters grow…and it’s so intense (I hope!)…

 Sowing/Quelling. There. Final answer. They can’t really be separated too much. Haha!

CTC:       Do you have any suggestions to help me become a better writer? If so, what are they?

AG:       Read! Read a lot. Join a critique group. But the biggest thing is be teachable! Be willing to listen to constructive criticism. WRITE, write, and write some more. Learn the rules and learn when to break them. Find your voice.

CTC:       Do you hear from your readers much? What kinds of things do they say?

AG:       Define “much,” haha! Some of my readers are also my crit partners, and I talk to them frequently. Thus far, everyone has pretty much loved my story. I think everyone who has read Sowing is eager for Quelling. They love the characters, the world-building, and they say “WHERE IS BOOK TWO?” a lot…

CTC:       Do you like to create books for adults?

AG:        Yes and no? I write sort of YA…and I say “sort of” because it’s really dark stuff most of the time. Dark themes, lots of violence… But I’d rather make books for adults than children, so… Haha!

CTC:       What do you think makes a good story?

AG:        There are so many elements that go into it, but for me, characters make or break a story. I can put up with a LOT of less-than-ideal stuff (grammar issues, plot holes – within reason, at least! – inconsistencies, etc.) as long as I care about the characters. Make me care, and you likely have me. Fail to make me care, and you can have the best plot in the world, and it will feel like I’m forcing myself through your book. Sorry…just how it is!

CTC:       As a child, what did you want to do when you grew up?

AG:       A cat. Ha! No, I probably wanted to be an artist or something. I’m sure at some point in my childhood, I did want to be a writer, though I don’t know if I even thought it could/would be a career.

CTC:       Is there anything else that you would like for the audience to know?

AG:       Um…Quelling should be out by the end of the year, and Sowing is out now! =) You can find it here: amzn.to/2ck9So6

CTC:       Again, thank you, Angie, for allowing me to take up your time.

You can follow Angie Griguliunas here:

http://www.facebook.com/angiegrigaliunaszewriter

http://www.instagram.com/angiegrigaliunas

http://www.twitter.com/angie_zewriter

Angie GrigaliunasAll is not as it seems.  In fact, nothing may be.

What would you do to find out who you really are?

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Trattora has never know where she came from. The only tie to her past is a bracelet engraved with her name. When she meets Velkan and discovers he also has an identical bracelet Trattora knows she must find answers. The quest for knowledge is filled with treachery and death. Trattora must leave her adopted parents and their planet, Cwelt, behind while they are in the midst of an invasion. Yet, she feels that finding the answers she seeks will also help her liberate Cwelt.

Hinkens first book in The Expulsion Project series, Girl of Fire, is a sci-fi dystopian. There is plenty of action in this adventure. It is well paced and the main character is fully developed. It has several heart-stopping twists and a surprise ending that leaves you wanting for more.

I strongly recommend this action-packed novel which will debut January 10, 2017. 5 out of 5 stars.

I received this book for free from the author for review consideration. This in no way affected my opinion of the book, or the content of my review.

How far will a corrupt corporation go?

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This book is due to be published in March 2017.

Genny and Nat continue their quest to stop the Genetics Operating Division from preventing Original births. With two Originals of their own Genny and Nat are living in a secluded area where the Chosen are protected. When new cancer patients surface at an alarming rate due to the Angel virus they take leave of their home to bring down the Genetics Operating Division once and for all.

Hagan’s second book in The Cure Series, The Angel Factor shows us just how far a corrupt corporation will go to control the population. This novel is very well written and paced. There are a few surprises and twists, some happy and some sad. Genny’s character continues to mature but keeps her almost fatal flaw of acting impulsively. There is the return of some beloved characters from the first book intermixed with some interesting new characters.

This story is a good study in how society deals with the truth and the changes that come from that discovery. Will Genny and Nat succeed in exposing the Genetics Operating Division and all of its lies? Will they be successful in finding a cure for the Angel virus? Or will the Genetics Operating Division have more going on behind the scenes than anyone could possibly imagine?

5 out of 5 stars.

I received this book for free from the author for review consideration. This in no way affected my opinion of the book, or the content of my review.